>The Myers Briggs Type Indicator for everyone

>So I’d rule the world with the Myers Briggs Type Indicator. I think it’s a fantastic psychometric tool that can help you understand so much about yourself. I qualified to use it in 2005 I think and have been using it at every opportunity since! I often reflect on my preferences and what I’m doing to either strenghten them or develop my non-preferences. So what’s the purpose of today’s blog? To keep it simple and easy for everyone to read and decipher.

I won’t go into the history of the MBTI. As important as it is, I want to focus on the preferences.

So firstly, are you an ‘extrovert’ or an ‘introvert’? It’s important to remember that although behaviours are what are observable, behaviours alone do not dictate preference. For an extrovert, they gain their energy from people and being active and interactive. That can take any form deemed appropriate. For an introvert they gain their energy from their own world. That means removing themselves from normal activity to have time they can use to reflect and find that energy they’re looking for. Both are fully capable and often display behvaiours that are described as ‘extrovert’ and as ‘introvert’. Because of this, people often say ‘I’m both’. Poppy cock. Do you prefer using your left or right hand regardless of how well you may use either? It’s the same principle. We have a natural pull that means we either gain our energy from others (extrovert) or from ourselves (introvert).

Next is do you have a ‘sensing’ or ‘intuiting’ preference. A sensing person is someone who tends to prefer things such as facts, practicalities, data, proven methods. An intuiting person is someone who tends to prefer things such as ideas, interpreting meanings, finding connections. It’s startling how observable the behaviours are for a sensing person compared to an intuiting person. Sensing people describe things very literally, do things practically and enjoy working according to tried and tested methods. Intuiting people like to work with uncertainties and find out solutions to problems in interesting and creative ways.

The third set of preferences are ‘thinking’ and ‘feeling’. A person who has thinking preference is someone who makes decisions about the world using logic as their key vehicle. A person with feeling preference uses their personal values system as their driver for making decisions. A thinking person is all about the process and making sure it works – business first, relationships second. A feeling person is all about harmony and ensuring that others are consulted – relationships first, business second. What I like best about trying to figure this set of preferences is how people see themselves. They define ‘feeling’ as being ’emotional’, or ‘thinking’ as being more ‘rational’ where that isn’t how Myers and Briggs define it at all. You can display just as much emotion/passion and rational thought using either thinking or feeling preference.

Last is to consider if you have ‘judging’ or ‘perceiving’ preference. A judging person likes to plan the world they work in. For them it’s all about schedules, keeping things on plan, having closure with things, being tidy and very deliberate about what they do. A perceiving person likes to work in a way which seems to make no sense. They have rough plans, out of date to-do-lists and generally seem haphazard in their approach to the world. The best example of thinking how the two differ comes in seeing how weekends are planned. A judging person will know what is happening in the weekend to come from Friday evening through to Sunday night. They will have times things are meant to happen, who with, when, where, and how. Perceiving people will have an idea of what’s happening over the weekend and will likely finalise plans minute before the next event is meant to take place.

So that’s an overview of the MBTI. The next step normally is to assign yourself a 4 letter ‘type’: E = Extrovert, I = Introvert, S = Sensing, N = iNtuition, T = Thinking, F = Feeling, J = Judging and P = Perceiving. A possible 16 types exist. There’s no best or worst type. It’s all about helping you to understand how you best operate. You are then able to define how best to work best with others. So for example, my type is ENFP. This is technically defined as extroverted intuiting with introverted feeling. That means nothing if you haven’t been through a formal training process to understand ‘type dynamics’. For me though, it helps me to think about what my strengths are, how these influence my life decisions, what weaknesses I’m likely to display and how I can employ methods to counter these.

The great thing about the MBTI is that it’s easy to understand and gives an easy overview of self-awareness. If you take the time to study it further though you begin to understand more about yourself, insights into your own life and how to use the tool to help you do more.

The downfall of the MBTI though is that too many people think they get it when they really don’t. Language becomes easily confused. They try to define others according to MBTI behaviours when they don’t really understand the language. Because there are 16 types, people feel they are blocked in and pigeon holed. The classic response is, “surely I’m all of these things at different times in my life?” This line of responses is mainly due to a lack of appreciation for the tool.

So hopefully the above gives a brief overview to the MBTI. There are a lot of available online resources to help find out more. If you want to get a true picture though please find someone who is formally qualified by OPP in the EU or CAPT in the US. They will give you full feedback on the tool, give you the full and proper questionnaire to complete and help you go through a full self selection about what type best fits your personality.

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Sukh Pabial

I'm an occupational psychologist by profession and am passionate about all things learning and development, creating holistic learning solutions and using positive psychology in the workforce.

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