>’Tis the season to do your appraisals

>Oh it’s that time of year. Collate feedback. Backtrack over the past year’s performance. Have meeting. Set objectives. Give rating. Salary review. Carry on and keep calm.

Appraisals are oft quoted as being the hardest task for managers. Why? Because managers are responsible for all those things above. And it’s hard work. Sure it comes with the responsibility, but it doesn’t make it easy. Especially if you have a big team to deal with. It’s no less a challenge for managers with small teams though. Either way it’s a burden. A necessary burden. A necessary evil. Actually, no. Check that. An essential necessity.

Carrying out appraisals are the most effective way of ensuring your team members are on track to help them achieve their personal goals, objectives, business goals and success. Even if you see your team member once a year, that will be the single most important meeting between a manager and your direct report.

Tom Peters talks about making arduous tasks into ‘WOW! Projects’. The essence of which says make an appraisal a meeting about excellence, creating a wider team of experts, setting amazing objectives and giving inspirational feedback. Yes, very American. But an interesting premise from which to work. My take on this? An appraisal should be a meaningful experience for all involved.

How can you make it meaningful? Well simple things like preparing in advance. Letting the team know meetings are upcoming. Ensure everyone is aware of what’s expected in the meeting. Have all paperwork completed before the meeting. Set uninterruptable time aside. Spend time listening to your direct reports thoughts about their performance. There’s more, much more, but it’s about committing to the process. Not because it’s a call from HR or the Exec team. But because it means so much to the success of a business.

Research (Corporate Leadership Council, Gallup) has shown that the discretionary effort from employees increases dependent on how well they are engaged by the organisation and their line managers. What is discretionary effort? The amount of effort an employee chooses to exercise based on how well they perceive they are being treated.

Employee engagement is a whole topic unto itself. But if a manager doesn’t commit to the appraisal process then you can wave goodbye to your staff. I will guarantee that with regards to appraisals, the following contribute to making it a poor process:
– last minute notification of meeting (i.e. tomorrow or even worse, this afternoon)
– poor solicited feedback
– poorly set and worded objectives
– badly delivered feedback
– lack of consideration of coaching opportunity
– judgements based on impressions rather than evidence based

Yet I’m amazed how many managers will use the excuse “but those things will happen because I have no time”. Nonsence. That’s a poor excuse to say “I’m not committed to the process and care little for the development of my staff”.

I’ve seen some great managers who don’t dismiss the importance of a good appraisal. Unfortunately they’re few and far between. Also they’re not shouted about enough to show what a great example looks like. Particulary though, it also falls on either HR or the Exec team to raise the profile of appraisals in a meaningful way.

‘Tis definitely the season to wind down and recharge those batteries. ‘Tis also the season to show your staff that you’re serious about their development.

Advertisements

Published by

Sukh Pabial

I'm an occupational psychologist by profession and am passionate about all things learning and development, creating holistic learning solutions and using positive psychology in the workforce.

One thought on “>’Tis the season to do your appraisals”

Say something...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s